Have a big employee communication challenge, but a limited budget? Need to jump start an internal communication program, but don’t want a long-term commitment? Davis & Company has a quick, proven solution for you. We’ll provide you with the smart thinking we’re known for, but at a price and scope that fits your needs. 

You’re smart and experienced, but sometimes you wish you could just get some quick advice on a challenge you face—the consulting equivalent of “phone a friend.”

You and your team spend a lot of time planning and managing town hall meetings. Although employees appreciate the opportunity to hear from leaders, you struggle to make town halls as interactive, dynamic and motivational as you know they can be.

You know that having a strong communication plan is essential for setting priorities, getting buy-in from key stakeholders and positioning yourself as strategist. But your workload is so intense that you don’t have the time or the mental bandwidth to develop a plan.

You’re committed to surveying employees to gain their feedback about internal communication. But you’re not an expert, so you worry that your draft survey questionnaire won’t generate the data you need to measure your current program and make meaningful improvements.

One of your pivotal communication vehicles—for example, a newsletter, all-employee email, intranet site or digital screen system—needs improvement. And you’d love some advice from expert consultants, writers and designers about the best ways to give your channel a refresh.

You’ve got a complicated problem to solve and little time to address it. And it would be great to pick an employee communication expert’s brain to get smart advice you can act on immediately.

You’re well aware of the importance of reaching out to employees and getting feedback, and you know that focus groups are an efficient qualitative research tool. But you don’t have much experience holding focus groups, and you need this effort to be a success.

Your organization makes a significant investment in leadership conferences and big group sessions, but you struggle to create meetings that are meaningful and memorable. There are so many moving parts and so many cooks in the kitchen that, far too often, meetings devolve into an endless series of boring PowerPoint presentations.

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