By being more specific (and focused), employees see clearly how to answer survey questions

 

How can you learn how to write better employee communication survey questions? Simple: take every survey that crosses your desk. For instance, in a recent blog, I shared an example from a survey I received after attending a web-based workshop.

Here’s another question from that survey:

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Please rate the webinar presenter.

[] 1   [] 2   [] 3   [] 4  [] 5

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I see two problems:

  1. The scale is not defined: is “1” good or bad?
  2. What criteria should I use rate the presenter? Her ability to speak clearly? To use the features of the web meeting tool? Perhaps both?

I’d fix this question by breaking the presenter’s effectiveness into key elements and asking a series of questions to understand how the presenter did. And change the scale, of course.

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Today’s presenter was easy to understand.

[] Strongly disagree   [] Disagree   [] Agree  [] Strongly disagree

Today’s presenter was knowledgeable about [insert topic].

[] Strongly disagree   [] Disagree   [] Agree  [] Strongly disagree

Today’s presenter provided ideas that I can use.

[] Strongly disagree   [] Disagree   [] Agree  [] Strongly disagree

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Being specific about the attributes of a successful presenter helps with two things: makes it easier (and faster) for a respondent to complete the survey and provides actionable data. Specific is always better than general when creating a survey.

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